easybakec0ven:

World of Darkness, Exhibition Building for Nocturnal Animals, Bronx Zoo, New York, 1967-69 (Morris Ketchum Jr. and Associates)

easybakec0ven:

World of Darkness, Exhibition Building for Nocturnal Animals, Bronx Zoo, New York, 1967-69
(Morris Ketchum Jr. and Associates)

To know how to free oneself is nothing; the arduous thing is to know what to do with one’s freedom.

The Immoralist (1902) by André Gide (via vintageanchorbooks)
wmud:

hubert bennett - hayward gallery, south bank, london, england, 1961

wmud:

hubert bennett - hayward gallery, south bank, london, england, 1961

ruckawriter:

worldoflis:

girldwarf:

Deconstructing Masculinity & Manhood with Michael Kimmel @ Dartmouth College

YAAAAEEESSSSSSS

You know what I like, and feel is so important? That he doesn’t say “Men thinks those are THEIR positions”. He says “We think those are OUR positions.”

As a male feminist, he still doesn’t exclude himself from the group of men.

Damn.

Well said.

(Source: exgynocraticgrrl)

zomgmouse:

Setsuko Hara, No Regrets for Our Youth (わが青春に悔なし) (Akira Kurosawa, 1946)

zomgmouse:

Setsuko Hara, No Regrets for Our Youth (わが青春に悔なし) (Akira Kurosawa, 1946)

austinkleon:

Saul Steinberg and Kurt Vonnegut
In A Man Without A Country, Vonnegut called Steinberg “the wisest person I ever met in my entire life”:

I could ask him anything, and six seconds would pass, and then he would give me a perfect answer, gruffly, almost a growl. He was born in Romania, in a house where, according to him, “the geese looked in the windows.”
I said, “Saul, how should I feel about Picasso?”
Six seconds passed, and then he said, “God put him on Earth to show us what it’s like to be really rich.” I said, “Saul, I am a novelist, and many of my friends are novelists and good ones, but when we talk I keep feeling we are in a very different businesses. What makes me feel that way?”
Six seconds passed, and then he said, “It’s very simple. There are two sorts of artists, one not being in the least superior to the other. But one responds to the history of his or her art so far, and the other responds to life itself.”
I said, “Saul, are you gifted?”
Six seconds passed, and then he growled, “No. But what you respond to in any work of art is the artist’s struggle against his or her limitations.’

Filed under: Steinberg, Vonnegut

austinkleon:

Saul Steinberg and Kurt Vonnegut

In A Man Without A Country, Vonnegut called Steinberg “the wisest person I ever met in my entire life”:

I could ask him anything, and six seconds would pass, and then he would give me a perfect answer, gruffly, almost a growl. He was born in Romania, in a house where, according to him, “the geese looked in the windows.”

I said, “Saul, how should I feel about Picasso?”

Six seconds passed, and then he said, “God put him on Earth to show us what it’s like to be really rich.” I said, “Saul, I am a novelist, and many of my friends are novelists and good ones, but when we talk I keep feeling we are in a very different businesses. What makes me feel that way?”

Six seconds passed, and then he said, “It’s very simple. There are two sorts of artists, one not being in the least superior to the other. But one responds to the history of his or her art so far, and the other responds to life itself.”

I said, “Saul, are you gifted?

Six seconds passed, and then he growled, “No. But what you respond to in any work of art is the artist’s struggle against his or her limitations.’

Filed under: Steinberg, Vonnegut

joeacollege:

Billie Holiday appears as a guest on the Eddie Condon Floor Show. (1948)

joeacollege:

Billie Holiday appears as a guest on the Eddie Condon Floor Show. (1948)

kitty-en-classe:

À bout de souffle (Jean-Luc Godard, 1960)

kitty-en-classe:

À bout de souffle (Jean-Luc Godard, 1960)

chordn:

Jazz is meant to be played with the head down and the eyes closed, as Jesus in The Desert, or Siddartha under The Bodhi. Contemplatively feeling with others on this moment of music.

kalidesc0pe:

had a really chill day today talking about music & photos etc. working on a sweet project with someone. :) i’m super excited! 

the prettiest <3 

kalidesc0pe:

had a really chill day today talking about music & photos etc. working on a sweet project with someone. :) i’m super excited! 

the prettiest <3 

theimpossiblecool:

“If you weren’t surprised by your life you wouldn’t be alive.”
William S. Burroughs

theimpossiblecool:

“If you weren’t surprised by your life you wouldn’t be alive.”

William S. Burroughs

Just finished reading William Gibson&#8217;s Count Zero - the second in the Sprawl trilogy. I’ve previously read Neuromancer, so this was my second time visiting Gibson’s cyberpunk universe, and just like last time I fell completely in love with it. I was originally unsure whether I would like it or not, but as everything comes together in the end of the novel I instantly felt it lived up the to success of Neuromancer. I have to admit I love science fiction just as much as I love classic/modern lit etc. Because (and this is something a lot of people don’t seem to see in sci-fi) they both serve as excellent ways to study humanity - yet while classic fiction tends to focus on the individual, science fiction usually takes a much grander scope. What I like so much about it is that by taking humanity and putting it in a place and time that feels so foreign, yet is entirely possible, we create a testing ground where we can play with and predict the consequences of our actions, our habits, our customs etc. It&#8217;s a great genre to explore themes of estrangement, political and corporate corruption, technological advancement, body alterations, socio-political segregation. Even race and sexuality plays a big part in the cyberpunk world, which I think is great (this inclusiveness is one of Gibson&#8217;s strong points - he always features a strong cast of female/poc characters).
Anyway, this book gets two cybernetic thumbs up from me. Up next is André Gide&#8217;s The Immoralist.

Just finished reading William Gibson’s Count Zero - the second in the Sprawl trilogy. I’ve previously read Neuromancer, so this was my second time visiting Gibson’s cyberpunk universe, and just like last time I fell completely in love with it. I was originally unsure whether I would like it or not, but as everything comes together in the end of the novel I instantly felt it lived up the to success of Neuromancer. I have to admit I love science fiction just as much as I love classic/modern lit etc. Because (and this is something a lot of people don’t seem to see in sci-fi) they both serve as excellent ways to study humanity - yet while classic fiction tends to focus on the individual, science fiction usually takes a much grander scope. What I like so much about it is that by taking humanity and putting it in a place and time that feels so foreign, yet is entirely possible, we create a testing ground where we can play with and predict the consequences of our actions, our habits, our customs etc. It’s a great genre to explore themes of estrangement, political and corporate corruption, technological advancement, body alterations, socio-political segregation. Even race and sexuality plays a big part in the cyberpunk world, which I think is great (this inclusiveness is one of Gibson’s strong points - he always features a strong cast of female/poc characters).

Anyway, this book gets two cybernetic thumbs up from me. Up next is André Gide’s The Immoralist.

Cave Girl - Noodlerz

Had the pleasure of seeing this band play the Red Gate last weekend. After everyone had a slice or two from the stack of Pizza a very confused looking woman delivered, Cave Girl kicked off the night with a really rad set. Check out the guitar playing.

(Bandcamp)

poboh:

Josef Sudek (Czech, 1896-1976) photographing Prague, Bohdan Kopecký. Czech (1928 - 2010)

poboh:

Josef Sudek (Czech, 1896-1976) photographing Prague, Bohdan Kopecký. Czech (1928 - 2010)